Sign up for our
FREE NEWSLETTER

Donít be just a Guest! Sign up for our monthly newsletter, 
delivered right to your inbox! 
FREE tips, ideas, and articles.
CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP

Welcome to 
GRISWOLD MOUNTAIN
Finely Handcrafted since 1996
Distinguished Products for Distinguished Handcrafters


"Beer is a sign that God loves us and wants us to be happy." 
     ~ Benjamin Franklin

Griswold Mountain Home Brewing Recipes

Imperial Stout St. Patrick's Green Beer Holiday Ale Irish Porter Octoberfest Ale Peach Ale Cherry Wheat Ale

 

Recipe for Imperial Stout Beer   
by Frank Holes, Sr.

St. Patrick's day gives us another great reason to enjoy our deep, dark Imperial Stout.  This is an intermediate level brew, and a good one for the beginner who has a few batches under his / her belt to attempt with the introduction of the steeping and sparging process.  The Imperial Stout produces a black, rich beer with a fine white foamy head when poured correctly.  Mmm, good brew!
Recipe for Imperial Stout Beer

4 gallons of good water

9 lbs of Pale Ale Malt Syrup

3 lbs Roasted Barley, crushed

1/2 lb Black Patent Malt, crushed

1/2 lb Crystal Malt, crushed

Steeping Sock

A good cooking thermometer

3 lbs Dried Malt Extract (DME) Plain Light

2 oz Nugget Hops

1 oz Fuggles Hops

1 oz East Kent Goldings Hops

1 oz Irish Moss

1 package of liquid American Ale yeast (or a packet of dry yeast if it's all you have)


Degree of Difficulty:  Intermediate

Imperial Stout Beer Recipe Directions:

In your large brew kettle, bring 4 gallons of water to approximately 160 degrees.  Steep the crushed grains in a steep sock in 155 - 160 degree water for 60 minutes.  Strain carefully (or sparge if you prefer) and remove the steep sock.  For beginners, you can pour off a bit of your hot water from the brew kettle and use it to strain through the sock, acting like a sparge.  

Place the malt syrup (still in its container) in a large bowl of warm water to make it easier to work with. 

Bring the kettle with sparged water to a boil.  Then slowly add the liquid malt syrup, stirring constantly. Add the dry malt extract (I like to pour off a bit of the wort and whisk in the DME in a large bowl, then pour everything back in to the kettle).  Boil for 30 minutes.

Add the Nugget hops and continue to boil for a 45 minutes. Stir often. 

With 15 minutes left in the boil, add in the Fuggles and East Kent Goldings hops, and the Irish Moss.

Once the boil time is over, remove the kettle from heat (I like to pour the wort off into another large pot I can cool in the sink - or use a wort chiller if you have one). Reduce the temperature to around 75 degrees F. 

Pour your wort into your primary fermentor, being sure to leave the bottom dregs in the pot. Fill up to the 5 gallon line with room temperature water, being careful to stay between 68 and 76 degrees F (don't kill the yeast).  

Stir in the yeast (pop your liquid yeast several hours or even a day earlier if necessary) well, and seal the fermentor with an airlock. Store in a room temperature place out of the way for 7-14 days. You can re-rack into a secondary fermentor after 7 days if you wish. 

Bottle and store for three more weeks (taste and carbonation both improve in my opinion).  This beer will keep in bottles for up to 4 months (but they probably will disappear well before then). This makes 5 gallons. 

This is a good recipe to try out if you're a beginner because of the principles of steeping and sparging.  Eventually you'll want to try your hand at a true mash and sparge system, though this will take a bit of more specialized equipment.  

 


Recipe for St. Patrick's Green Beer   
by Frank Holes, Sr.

Each year, we brew a light beer colored green just for St. Patrick's Day.  It has become an annual event, and is perfect for parties.  If you get it brewing in late January or early February, it should be ready for the big day.
Recipe for St. Patrick's Green Beer

2 gallons of good water

4 lbs of Pale Malt Syrup

3 lbs Dried Malt Extract (DME) Plain Light

1 lb Rice Syrup

1 oz Liberty Hops

1 oz Irish Moss

1 oz Mt. Hood Hops

1 package of liquid American Ale yeast (or a packet of dry yeast if it's all you have)

8 to 16 drops of green food coloring

St. Patrick's Green Beer Recipe Directions:

In your large brew kettle, bring 2 gallons of water to a boil. The more water available to boil at the beginning will provide you with a much lighter colored finished product, making it easier to color.  

Place the malt syrup (still in its container) in a large bowl of warm water to make it easier to work with. 

Once the kettle comes to a boil, slowly add the liquid malt syrup, stirring constantly. Add the dry malt extract (I like to pour off a bit of the wort and whisk in the DME in a large bowl, then pour everything back in to the kettle) and the rice syrup. 

Once all the malt is stirred in, add the Liberty hops. Start your timer for a 45 minute boil. Stir often. 

With 15 minutes left in the boil, add the Irish Moss. At 5 minutes left, add the Mt. Hood hops.

Once the boil time is over, remove the kettle from heat (I like to pour the wort off into another large pot I can cool in the sink - or use a wort chiller if you have one). Reduce the temperature to around 75 degrees F. 

Pour your wort into your primary fermentor, being sure to leave the bottom dregs in the pot. Fill up to the 5 gallon line with room temperature water, being careful to stay between 68 and 76 degrees F (don't kill the yeast).  Add in the green food coloring a little at a time, stirring well, until you reach the desired green coloring.

Stir in the yeast (pop your liquid yeast several hours or even a day earlier if necessary) well, and seal the fermentor with an airlock. Store in a room temperature place out of the way for 7-14 days. You can re-rack into a secondary fermentor after 7 days if you wish. 

Bottle and store for three more weeks (taste and carbonation both improve in my opinion). You can also add another few drops at bottling if you want more green coloring. This beer will keep in bottles for up to 4 months (but they probably will disappear well before then). This makes 5 gallons. 

Be sure to share your green beer with friends and family.  They'll be amazed at your ingeniousness.  

 


Recipe for Holiday Ale   
by Frank Holes, Sr.

This spiced light ale has the aroma of peppermint and spices .  
Recipe for Holiday Ale

2 gallons of good water

6 lbs of Light Malt Syrup

4 lbs Dried Malt Extract (DME), light

2 lbs Orange Blossom Honey

1 oz Northern Brewer Hops

1 oz Irish Moss

1 Cinnamon stick

1 tbsp Peppermint extract

1 vanilla bean, split

1 oz Hallertauer Hops

1 package of liquid American Ale yeast (or a packet of dry yeast if it's all you have)

Holiday Ale Recipe Directions:

In your large brew kettle, bring 2 gallons of water to a boil. The more water available to boil at the beginning will provide you with a much lighter colored finished product.

If you're using liquid malt, place the malt syrup (still in its container) in a large bowl of warm water to make it easier to work with. 

Once the kettle comes to a boil, slowly add the malt stirring constantly. When we use dry malt extract, we like to pour off a bit of the wort and whisk in the DME in a large bowl, then pour everything back in to the kettle.

Once all the malt is stirred in, add the Northern Brewer hops. Start your timer for a 60 minute boil. Stir often. 

With 15 minutes left in the boil, add the Irish Moss, the cinnamon stick, peppermint extract, and the vanilla bean. At 2 minutes left, add the Hallertauer hops.

Once the boil time is over, remove the kettle from heat (I like to pour the wort off into another large pot I can cool in the sink - or use a wort chiller if you have one). Reduce the temperature to around 75 degrees F. 

Add the wort carefully into your primary fermentor, being sure to leave the bottom dregs in the pot. Fill up to the 5 gallon line with room temperature water, being careful to stay between 68 and 76 degrees F (don't kill the yeast). 

Stir in the yeast (pop your liquid yeast several hours or even a day earlier if necessary) well, and seal the fermentor with an airlock. Store in a room temperature place out of the way for 7-14 days. You can re-rack into a secondary fermentor after 7 days if you wish. 

Bottle and store for three more weeks (taste and carbonation both improve in my opinion).  This beer will keep in bottles for up to 8 months (but they probably will disappear well before then). This makes 5 gallons. 

 

Recipe for Irish Porter   
by Frank Holes, Sr.

This dark, robust Porter is perfect for relaxing in front of your fireplace on cold, autumn nights.  
Recipe for Irish Porter

2 gallons of good water

1/4  lb Black patent malt

1/4 lb Crystal malt

6 lbs of Dark Malt Extract (liquid or dry)

2 oz Nugget Hops

1 oz Irish Moss

1 oz Fuggles Hops

1 package of liquid Irish Ale yeast (or a packet of dry yeast if it's all you have)

Irish Porter Recipe Directions:

In your large brew kettle, bring 2 gallons of water to 150 degrees (F). The more water available to boil at the beginning will provide you with a much lighter colored finished product.

In a steeping bag, combine the Black Patent and Crystal Malt grains.  Steep in the 150 degree (F) water for 30 minutes, being careful to maintain the water temperature.  Remove the steeping bag and strain back into the pot.  Turn temperature up to high and increase the wort to a boil.

If you're using liquid malt, place the malt syrup (still in its container) in a large bowl of warm water to make it easier to work with. 

Once the kettle comes to a boil, slowly add the malt stirring constantly. If you're using dry malt extract, pour off a bit of the wort and whisk in the DME in a large bowl, then pour everything back in to the kettle.

Once all the malt is stirred in, add the Nugget hops. Start your timer for a 45 minute boil. Stir often. 

With 15 minutes left in the boil, add the Irish Moss. At 2 minutes left, add the Fuggles hops.

Once the boil time is over, remove the kettle from heat (I like to pour the wort off into another large pot I can cool in the sink - or use a wort chiller if you have one). Reduce the temperature to around 75 degrees F. 

Add the wort carefully into your primary fermentor, being sure to leave the bottom dregs in the pot. Fill up to the 5 gallon line with room temperature water, being careful to stay between 68 and 76 degrees F (don't kill the yeast). 

Stir in the yeast (pop your liquid yeast several hours or even a day earlier if necessary) well, and seal the fermentor with an airlock. Store in a room temperature place out of the way for 7-14 days. You can re-rack into a secondary fermentor after 7 days if you wish. 

Bottle and store for three more weeks (taste and carbonation both improve in my opinion).  This beer will keep in bottles for up to 8 months (but they probably will disappear well before then). This makes 5 gallons. 

 

Recipe for Oktoberfest Ale   
by Frank Holes, Sr.

This rich, malty red ale is seasoned for the celebrations of Oktoberfest.  
Recipe for Oktoberfest Ale

2 gallons of good water

6 lbs of Amber Malt Syrup

4 lbs Dried Malt Extract (DME), light

1 oz Northern Brewer Hops

1 oz Irish Moss

1 oz Hallertauer Hops

1 package of liquid German Ale yeast (or a packet of dry yeast if it's all you have)

1 tbsp Cinnamon or 2 Cinnamon sticks

1 tsp Ground Cloves

1/2 tsp Ground Nutmeg

Oktoberfest Ale Recipe Directions:

In your large brew kettle, bring 2 gallons of water to a boil. The more water available to boil at the beginning will provide you with a much lighter colored finished product.

Place the malt syrup (still in its container) in a large bowl of warm water to make it easier to work with. 

Once the kettle comes to a boil, slowly add the liquid malt syrup, stirring constantly. Add the dry malt extract (I like to pour off a bit of the wort and whisk in the DME in a large bowl, then pour everything back in to the kettle).

Once all the malt is stirred in, add the Northern Brewer hops. Start your timer for a 60 minute boil. Stir often. 

With 15 minutes left in the boil, add the Irish Moss. At 10 minutes left, add the Hallertauer hops and the spices.

Once the boil time is over, remove the kettle from heat (I like to pour the wort off into another large pot I can cool in the sink - or use a wort chiller if you have one). Reduce the temperature to around 75 degrees F. 

Add the wort carefully into your primary fermentor, being sure to leave the bottom dregs in the pot. Fill up to the 5 gallon line with room temperature water, being careful to stay between 68 and 76 degrees F (don't kill the yeast). 

Stir in the yeast (pop your liquid yeast several hours or even a day earlier if necessary) well, and seal the fermentor with an airlock. Store in a room temperature place out of the way for 7-14 days. You can re-rack into a secondary fermentor after 7 days if you wish. 

Bottle and store for three more weeks (taste and carbonation both improve in my opinion).  This beer will keep in bottles for up to 4 months (but they probably will disappear well before then). This makes 5 gallons. 

This malty amber ale will be a frothy delight for the end of the harvest season.

 

Recipe for Peach Ale   
by Frank Holes, Sr.

The peach trees in our orchard provided the inspiration for this light American ale.  Use fresh peaches if they're available, or in a pinch use a peach flavoring.
Recipe for Peach Ale

2 gallons of good water

4 lbs of Pale Malt Syrup

3 lbs Dried Malt Extract (DME) Plain Amber

1 lb Rice Syrup

1 oz Liberty Hops

1 oz Irish Moss

1 oz Mt. Hood Hops

1 package of liquid American Ale yeast (or a packet of dry yeast if it's all you have)

2 lbs of ripe peaches, or a 4oz bottle of peach flavoring

Light Peach Ale Recipe Directions:

In your large brew kettle, bring 2 gallons of water to a boil. The more water available to boil at the beginning will provide you with a much lighter colored finished product.

Place the malt syrup (still in its container) in a large bowl of warm water to make it easier to work with. 

Once the kettle comes to a boil, slowly add the liquid malt syrup, stirring constantly. Add the dry malt extract (I like to pour off a bit of the wort and whisk in the DME in a large bowl, then pour everything back in to the kettle) and the rice syrup. 

Once all the malt is stirred in, add the Liberty hops. Start your timer for a 45 minute boil. Stir often. 

With 15 minutes left in the boil, add the Irish Moss. At 5 minutes left, add the Mt. Hood hops.

Once the boil time is over, remove the kettle from heat (I like to pour the wort off into another large pot I can cool in the sink - or use a wort chiller if you have one). Reduce the temperature to around 75 degrees F. 

If you are using fresh peaches, boil them in a large kettle for a few minutes.  Smash up the soft peaches and pour these into your primary fermentor. If you are using peach flavoring, pour in while adding the wort. Add in the wort, being sure to leave the bottom dregs in the pot. Fill up to the 5 gallon line with room temperature water, being careful to stay between 68 and 76 degrees F (don't kill the yeast). 

Stir in the yeast (pop your liquid yeast several hours or even a day earlier if necessary) well, and seal the fermentor with an airlock. Store in a room temperature place out of the way for 7-14 days. You can re-rack into a secondary fermentor after 7 days if you wish. 

Bottle and store for three more weeks (taste and carbonation both improve in my opinion). You can also add another 4 oz of peach flavoring at bottling if you want a more pronounced peach flavor. This beer will keep in bottles for up to 4 months (but they probably will disappear well before then). This makes 5 gallons. 

This light, crisp beer with a slight peach aroma and flavor is wonderful during those 'dog days' of the end of summer.

 

 

Recipe for home brewed
Cherry Wheat Ale
by Frank Holes, Sr.

Even after eleven years of home brewing, we still make our small batches just the same way we started long ago - from a kit or just like a kit.  Our cherry wheat ale was first developed back in 1998 and played with since then.  We've enjoyed experimenting with cherries in our beers, from the cherry wheat to a cherry-nut-brown, to a chocolate-cherry porter.  You can use your favorite wheat kit (German or American) with this recipe or check your beer pantry for the individual ingredients below.
Recipe for Cherry Wheat Ale

2 gallons of good water

6 lbs of Wheat Malt Syrup (a 55 wheat/45 barley mix is preferred)

2 lbs Dried Malt Extract (DME) Wheat

2 oz Liberty Hops

1 oz Irish Moss

1 package of liquid American Wheat yeast (or a packet of dry yeast if it's all you have)

2 lbs of ripe (or frozen) cherries, or a 4oz bottle of cherry flavoring, or 2 cans of cherry pie filling

Cherry Wheat Ale Recipe Directions:

In your large brew kettle, bring 2 gallons of water to a boil.  The more water available to boil at the beginning will provide you with a much lighter colored finished product.

Place the malt syrup (still in its container) in a large bowl of warm water to make it easier to work with.  

Once the kettle comes to a boil, slowly add the liquid malt syrup, stirring constantly.  Add the dry malt extract (I like to pour off a bit of the wort and whisk in the DME in a large bowl, then pour everything back in to the kettle).  

Once all the malt is stirred in, add half of the hops.  Start your timer for a 45 minute boil.  Stir often.  

With 15 minutes left in the boil, add the Irish Moss.  At 5 minutes left, add the remainder of the hops.

Once the boil time is over, remove the kettle from heat (I like to pour the wort off into another large pot I can cool in the sink - or use a wort chiller if you have one).  Reduce the temperature to around 75 degrees F.  

If you are using fresh ripe cherries, frozen cherries, or even cherry pie filling, pour this into your primary fermentor.  If you are using cherry flavoring, pour in while adding the wort.  Add in the wort, being sure to leave the bottom dregs in the pot.  Fill up to the 5 gallon line with room temperature water, being careful to stay between 68 and 76 degrees F (don't kill the yeast).  

Stir in the yeast (pop your liquid yeast several hours or even a day earlier if necessary) well, and seal the fermentor with an airlock.  Store in a room temperature place out of the way for 7-14 days.  You can re-rack into a secondary fermentor after 7 days if you wish.  

Bottle and store for three more weeks (taste and carbonation both improve in my opinion).  You can also add another 4 oz of cherry flavoring at bottling if you want a more pronounced cherry flavor.  This beer will keep in bottles for up to 4 months (but they probably will disappear well before then).  This makes 5 gallons.  

We use fresh ripe cherries picked picked off our trees during the summer, but you can use the frozen cherries, cherry flavoring, and we've even made this beer with two cans of cherry pie filling during the winter.  You'd be surprised that it does turn out well!

 

 

Recipe for home brewed
Cherry Wheat Ale
by Frank Holes, Sr.

Even after eleven years of home brewing, we still make our small batches just the same way we started long ago - from a kit or just like a kit.  Our cherry wheat ale was first developed back in 1998 and played with since then.  We've enjoyed experimenting with cherries in our beers, from the cherry wheat to a cherry-nut-brown, to a chocolate-cherry porter.  You can use your favorite wheat kit (German or American) with this recipe or check your beer pantry for the individual ingredients below.
Recipe for Cherry Wheat Ale

2 gallons of good water

6 lbs of Wheat Malt Syrup (a 55 wheat/45 barley mix is preferred)

2 lbs Dried Malt Extract (DME) Wheat

2 oz Liberty Hops

1 oz Irish Moss

1 package of liquid American Wheat yeast (or a packet of dry yeast if it's all you have)

2 lbs of ripe (or frozen) cherries, or a 4oz bottle of cherry flavoring, or 2 cans of cherry pie filling

Cherry Wheat Ale Recipe Directions:

In your large brew kettle, bring 2 gallons of water to a boil.  The more water available to boil at the beginning will provide you with a much lighter colored finished product.

Place the malt syrup (still in its container) in a large bowl of warm water to make it easier to work with.  

Once the kettle comes to a boil, slowly add the liquid malt syrup, stirring constantly.  Add the dry malt extract (I like to pour off a bit of the wort and whisk in the DME in a large bowl, then pour everything back in to the kettle).  

Once all the malt is stirred in, add half of the hops.  Start your timer for a 45 minute boil.  Stir often.  

With 15 minutes left in the boil, add the Irish Moss.  At 5 minutes left, add the remainder of the hops.

Once the boil time is over, remove the kettle from heat (I like to pour the wort off into another large pot I can cool in the sink - or use a wort chiller if you have one).  Reduce the temperature to around 75 degrees F.  

If you are using fresh ripe cherries, frozen cherries, or even cherry pie filling, pour this into your primary fermentor.  If you are using cherry flavoring, pour in while adding the wort.  Add in the wort, being sure to leave the bottom dregs in the pot.  Fill up to the 5 gallon line with room temperature water, being careful to stay between 68 and 76 degrees F (don't kill the yeast).  

Stir in the yeast (pop your liquid yeast several hours or even a day earlier if necessary) well, and seal the fermentor with an airlock.  Store in a room temperature place out of the way for 7-14 days.  You can re-rack into a secondary fermentor after 7 days if you wish.  

Bottle and store for three more weeks (taste and carbonation both improve in my opinion).  You can also add another 4 oz of cherry flavoring at bottling if you want a more pronounced cherry flavor.  This beer will keep in bottles for up to 4 months (but they probably will disappear well before then).  This makes 5 gallons.  

We use fresh ripe cherries picked picked off our trees during the summer, but you can use the frozen cherries, cherry flavoring, and we've even made this beer with two cans of cherry pie filling during the winter.  You'd be surprised that it does turn out well!

 

Email us at griswold@griswoldmountain.com